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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
the fiscal cliff. something that could crush the consumer. all of which means it's a very confusing moment. we want to stick with best of breed that can come bouncing back whenever our leaders reach a deal. companies like ascena retail group, asna. formally known as dress barn. we've been fans because they have a terrific model. own multiple niche brands, maurice's for 20-something women, dress barn, appeals to a more middle aged woman, and charming shops, giving them two successful plus-sized chains. i believe in this deal because they have a record of making transitions work. the stock got slammed today, falling 4.3%, they delivered a four-cent earnings beat, revenues were in line, but still rose 48% year-over-year. and they reaffirmed their guidance for 2013, numbers slightly less than what some on wall street were expecting. what happened here, i think, is the stock ran 35% for the year. expectations got to elevated for some, well, they say they were disappointed. let's talk to the president and ceo of ascena retail group to learn more about the quarter and the profits. welcome back to
of a fiscal cliff, am i missing something here? can it be such a bad thing. not really said the cbo. if congress extents current policy, the debt and deficit will increase slowing the economy and dramatically increasing interest costs. because of the deal congress and the president made last year it be result in across the board budget reductions, still there will be no decreases in social security, medicare and veteran's benefits. defense spending would take a big hit, but because of a windown in afghanistan some military leaders are asking for less than congress is willing to shell out. from 1990 to 1999 defense spending decreased by 1% a year. this weakened military is nonsense. jim we have like what 27,000 times to blow up the country with the next amount of nukes. >> and we still have massive armies in europe protecting them from a massive soviet union. >> yeah. >> korea is another issue -- we do need people there. >> stephanie: right, but he points out who is behind all of this fiscal cliff cage rattling. the rich and their friends. any changes on the low,
of the lessons klaxon not me start with the fiscal cliff i want to say something like the contract for america, the balanced budget, welfare reform. ronald reagan's supply-side economics, i'm proud of the number of things that made no sense in washington. there is no fiscal clef. this is absolute total nonsense. the best way to understand what happens to all of us is to write a great essay by thomas wolfe entitled of the flag catchers. this goes back i think to the 60's when he first wrote this. now, she's trying to describe the particular pattern in san francisco in which the welfare department has figured out all of the senior to the to be on the second floor of the office hiding from the people they served screening the people who are mad and the samoan community in san francisco having figured out the game was and so we have six foot five and 6 feet six summer winds carrying the traditional war close and they would walk up to the front desk and say i want to see the boss and a staff person would say we are not supposed to let you see the boss and they would start to hit the floor. so we wo
cliff argument. turns out he's not alone. let's look at something we've been seeing this week. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your first world problems and getting on youtube so you can see gang 'nam style. ♪ gangnam style >> and start using those sprerbl social media skills to sign people up on this baby. three people a week, let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> ifill: "these old coots will clean out the treasury." this is alan simpson in his best but a completely different venue. >> i talked to him today and he said "i think i could go around the world in 90 days and never had the impact that this silly little thing did." and the idea behind this, he's hooked up with "the can kicks back" helping young people try to get involved and get engaged in the fiscal cliff and making decisions. and they're using a lot of twitter and other social media to make their point. >> ifill: they tweeted "when politicians delay, young people pay, it's time to fix our debt." is this effective?
. don't go over a fiscal cliff." or, you know, "pay our bills," or, "do something about the budget." now, i think even though the people tend to not be open to a lot of different views, they want the people they elect to make government work. >> so, we have created a political system that rewards intransigence. >> we've created a system that says, "we reward incivility. we reward refusal to compromise. we punish people who compromise and are civil and get along well with the people on the other side of the aisle." so, why are we surprised that that's what we get in everything in life? you get what you reward. and you don't get what you punish. and that's what we've done to our political system. >> what's in store for the fate of a democracy that cannot be flexible enough to compromise between its strongly-held prejudices? >> you know, if you have hardening of the arteries, it'll kill you as a person and it'll kill you as a country. what you have to do is to be able to maintain the health of the democracy by saying, "it depends on people of different perspectives to come together, have in
. is this something that can work out. like they did it wall street before the fiscal cliff hits? if we could rebuild when we're in such bad shape. host: thank you, judy. guest: repaying the money that was barred from social security. that money will be repaid unless congress does something different. think about the $2.7 trillion as spending authority for the social security administration. they can pay full benefits under the law. that money will be paid back over time unless congress changes something. putting more revenue money into social security, right now the appetite in congress is to cut spending. that might be a difficult sell. one reason the program is popular is it is self funded through payroll taxes. there's been a temporary cut in payroll taxes over the past two years. to change the funding of the nature could be done. advocates worry about the consequences of that and making it compete with other dollars with other government programs. congress doesn't touch it and still stays there. if it is competing for scarce dollars, it is more likely it will be cut. host: we saw a changeover a
the fiscal cliff and another recession. host: for that to happen, something has to happen this week? guest: not this week but every day that so little gets done raises the chance it will go wrong. i worry about that a lot. guest: it is a small deal, they can do something quickly. it may not require even a roll- call vote. to do the big deal, they did not have enough time to do the big deal when congress reconvenes on november 13. host: final word? guest: i think it is time to talk about the spending side. look at anyone trying to run a federal agency and they are being told the budget will be cut at 14% across the board beginning january 2. this is a ridiculous way to run a country. host: douglas holtz-eakin is the former director of the congressional budget office. stancollander thank you both for being with us. we will take a closer look of some of those special interest groups that are lobbying on behalf of what may happen with the so-called fiscal cliff. later, we will turn our attention to what is next for the u.s. and nato in relation to syria. other let's look at the guests and topi
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to find something who sdn have aen opinion on the fiscal cliff. this weekend, the ahead of the imf said the united states is more vulnerable to its domestic trouble more than anything else happening in the eurozone. christine lagarde says a balanced approach is needed and she says don't kick the can down the road, which is rich coming from a european. >>> european trading the lower this morning. italy's prime minister mario monti, yes, the same one that is famous from all the anti-trust things back in the -- was that the '90s? >> the '90s, yeah. >> monti announcing he'll step down before his term ends. the decision comes after the party of sylvia berlusconi withdrew support for monti's government last week. berlusconi has indicated he will run for leadership again. cnbc's carolin roth will join us from italy with the latest in a few minutes. when i was over there, i had to have the -- all the political signs translated because there's a picture of monti sitting under a beach chair drinking a drink and all the text was send monti to the beach. they already didn't like him. >> he had very
is that rationality will prevail and the president and congress shall make a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff and another recession. host: for that to happen, something has to happen this week? guest: not this week but every day that so little gets done raises the chance it will go wrong. i worry about that a lot. guest: it is a small deal, they can do something quickly. it may not require even a roll-call vote. to do the big deal, they did not have enough time to do the big deal when congress reconvenes on november 13. so the idea with two weeks to go is very small. host: final word? guest: i think it is time to talk about the spending side. look at anyone trying to run a federal agency and they are being told the budget will be cut at 14% across the board beginning january 2. this is a ridiculous way to run a country. host: douglas holtz-eakin is the former director of the congressional budget office. stancollander thank you both for being with us. >> and now a lookity role of lob yist in the negotiations on the so called fiscal cliff. this is from today's washington journal and is 25 minut
before we could possibly go over the fiscal cliff. both sides are reacting this weekend. but one prominent democrat today suggesting he's more confident a fiscal cliff deal will get done. >> three days ago i would have said that the chances of something being worked out were at best 20%. i feel a little bit more comfortable believing that something is going to be worked out, give it about a 70% chance. the fact that boehner and the president have pretty much gotten to a point where they'll be sitting down trying to work this out as opposed to a lot of cooks in the kitchen, i think that's helpful. >> the president has the upper hand on the politics right now. i mean, there are more people who make less than there are in the top 1%, top 5% or whatever. but will it create jobs? and while the president has spent most of this negotiation process talking about taxes, he hasn't talked about cuts as much as we want to see. >> joining me now, congressional reporter for roll call meredith shiner and washington bureau chief for "usa today" susan page. susan, you heard congressman cummings t
fiscal cliff. but it has everything to do with obamacare. >> now, it is true that a lot of those taxes did take place after the election. that's something we pointed out and is a fair point. but let me just ask you about the compromise we have to go to. because like i said, again, to get this done, taxes are -- i mean, they're going to go up on somebody. i just believe that this is what is going to happen. i think tom cole thinks it's going to happen. i think tom coburn thinks it's going to happen. i wanted to play a bite from him and get your reaction. here he is. >> sure. >> i'm okay to compromise even on some of my issues, if, in fact, we'll solve the problem. but what we have is a game being played for political -- for the extreme right wing and the extreme left win rather than coming together and leading and solving the problem. >> so grover norquist. if you had to accept the tax rates would go up, all right, just they're going to go up and they're going to go up on somebody. what would you really want in return? not revenue-neutral. real tax increases. what do you want in return?
different. are you hearing that social security might be something that's also included in the fiscal cliff deal? >> well, i'm hearing the democrats want to block that. they don't want the social security part of the deal. but the republicans are kind of insisting on it. that puts the white house in kind of a difficult position. that's one of the many issues holding up this deal right now. >> the political leverage in all of this, of course, some head pulling, indicating republicans would bear most of the blame if we go over the so-called cliff. last week's survey found that 21% of americans would blame president obama and the democrats. 23% say they would blame the republicans. 52% would be annoyed with both parties equally. is it really clear at this point who would be blamed? >> i think the -- >> i'm sorry. excuse me. >> it's okay. i think members of congress bear the brunt of this, especially the house. they're going to be the odd man out. i think in the end voters, if the deal does not happen, the house will carry a lot of blame for it. >> two member numbers very imp 39.6%, 35%. the p
in there a little bit too. i love him too. also, they have two jobs to do. taxes, fiscal cliff. why do you have to bring in social security and medicare and fix something that's not broke? >> stephanie: social security's case, we keep saying doesn't add a penny to the deficit. >> it is absurd. if you're going to curtail something or act like something is horribly busted, then i would say the military expenditures that go into effect because of the sequestration actually are something that's a crucial. they're going to drop off immediately and the spending on them is overtly far beyond its necessity. >> stephanie: it is more than the military asks for. congress is trying to give them more. >> to do what with? it is not like they're not ahead technologically from -- on every front. >> but we need to be able to blow up the world 150 times not 147. >> stephanie: otherwise we're french and gay. ron in illinois, you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi ron. >> caller: good morning, steph. >> stephanie: good morning. >> caller
. and -- >> but for everybody to -- to do that, to say we have to go over this fiscal cliff -- >> we don't have to -- >> in order so that everybody -- >> you could have legislation ready to introduce that week. >> congressman hensarling, before you go, something like that, would -- i mean i hear this from both sides, that if we just go over the president would introduce this legislation to lower rates, republicans who have signed grover norquist's pledge would be able to go along with that and say this is what we did. i didn't vote to raise taxes, i voted to lower taxes. is that the most likely scenario? >> makes sense? >> i'm not a las vegas bookie so i'm not going to say what is most likely scenario. i don't know and my crystal ball is a little fuzzy. again all this talk of taxes is marginally irrelevant. you give the president all of the tax increases that he has requested it's roughly about 23% of his ten-year spending budget. even 1.6 trillion. at most is maybe, 22%, 23%. the additional -- >> but going over that cliff, that's real money. and by the way, that's not that revenue thing. that'
a business network, i have to ask you, you're a businessman. does this fiscal cliff stuff worry you and the prospect of higher taxes worry you? what do you think? >> i think it worries all of us, doesn't it? i'm one that has faith. i believe something is going to happen. i believe we'll have a deal before it gets over the cliff personally. i'm an optimist. >> you're in farming. you have a guesthouse on your land down in georgia. what do you your customers tell you about the state of the economy? >> we get varying points of view from the discussions we have at the plantation. again, i think the majority of folks that come and, you know, have discussions of all types, especially when it gets to the economy, they are optimists and they feel like the country is getting better, albeit more slowly than we would all like. but i think the overall feeling is that it's going to be okay. just take a deep breath, move forward. >> let's turn to music, shall we, steve, come on. >> if you don't know one of the things he's famous for, rolling stones, 1982 but the most classic piano solo in the hist
the fiscal cliff at the end of the year, we are in for a big stock market. i like that. chief investment officer joins us now. thanks, hitting the market actually believes we will come to a deal. >> absolutely. you get this sense it doesn't really wants to sell off even with all this uncertainty with both sides going back and forth, are we talking, are we not talking. the market seems to be creeping higher, seems to be seen through what is traditional political rhetoric and grandstanding and recognizing a deal will be done. ashley: it is one thing to get a deal, one other thing to get a bad one. even though we did not follow the cliff, we are stuck with a lot of bad decisions. >> even in a bad deal, tracy, one thing we can say is certainty will replace uncertainty. that is a big headwind for this economy. all of this uncertainty throughout the second half of this year, all of 2012 will be replaced with certainty and that should unleash pent-up demand when we see it in the construction, in capital spending, housing improving, certainty replacing uncertainty will be a big theme in 2013. tr
cliff. >> i know, the way he said that was unnerving. let me tell you something. >> it's also just that egotism that everybody reacts to. >> i was in china for ten days and with a group of mayors, the mayor of philadelphia, beijing, mayor nutter. and you know, people in china are asking about the fiscal cliff. everywhere we went. what's going on with you people? so the world is watching. and it's not just us. and i don't care, maybe you think the chinese, well, too bad for them, but it's not just the chinese, it's europe, and they're blaming the fact that their economies aren't going based on the fact that we're in this stalemate. you know, it's huge. >> harold, i mean, it all comes down to leadership. you know, when you talk to business owners, they want leadership shown. i'm glad the president is talking to business leaders now. >> and a debater on the phone. >> not only the administration but also on the other side of pennsylvania avenue with the republicans and harry reid in the senate. you're just not seeing it. >> you don't see enough of it. curiously, the markets -- investor
this fiscal cliff thing obviously everybody's talking about oh we've gotta cut the entitlements like medicare. you've been pointing out something for awhile that we don't have a medicare problem. we have a healthcare cost problem. explain please, healthcare geek. >> this is one of the things people should really pay attention to because the healthcare crisis in this country gets so complicate and convoluted that people tune it out and then the republicans have this incredible opportunity to swoop in and make stuff up. we don't have a medicare problem. we have a healthcare cost problem. there is no competition in the healthcare market place right now. >> stephanie: right. >> okay. and people make money in the healthcare industry when prices go up. >> right. >> corporations make money when prices go up. we're talking about medical device manufacturers, drug companies, health insurance companies, they all make money the higher the prices are. they have no incentive to work for the public good. their incent sieve t
. caller: hi. i have two questions concerning the fiscal cliff. the cash cuts that republicans -- the spending cuts on medicare. why don't we allow them to negotiate medicare and to reduce the cost of medicine? that should save you a lot of money yearly. i agree totally about the republicans and democrats spending money stupidly just before the election. both sides voted to refurbish something like 170 army tanks that the army said they'd do not need. they went and voted to repair those tanks. why are we wasting our money? democrats want to cut taxes. host: armstrong williams? guest: we haven't gotten to affordable care and medicare and medicaid. if affordable care was administered correctly and if he did not have the special interest groups and if tort reform was not included, package you move forward in making health care work for anyone if you do not bring tort reform to the table? the medical malpractice lawsuits are out of control where doctors are paranoid and have to think twice before going through these procedures. it becomes a nightmare for doctors. there are too many
] >> stephanie: okay. sean hannity. >> considering the significant consequences of falling off of the fiscal cliff you have would think the president would have some kind of an interest in finding a solution to the problem. however, it is now becoming increasingly obvious something is standing in the way. a reporter at the "new york times" is admitting, well it may just be obama's arrogance. >> stephanie: oh! [ applause ] >> stephanie: arrogance! >> what do you think he won an election or something? >> stephanie: yeah. >> sheeesh. >> stephanie: dog whistle. >> were you impersonating a dog whistle. woo woo? >> no, i was not. >> you wouldn't hear a dog whistle. but that would distract the dog that was distracted by the farting machine. [ farting sounds ] >> even a monkey in a shearling coat would distract the dog. right >> stephanie: right. all right. rush limbaugh. >> i thought we were on track for much sooner than that. the obama plan to knock down america, obviously -- i'm surprised it is going to take that long. 2030 is another eightteen, seventeen years. >> stephanie:
and the white house signalling that we'll go off the cliff if we have to. i posted something from the l.a. times. fiscal cliff let's take the plunge in the l.a. times. he said the u.s. deficit and debt will fall social security will go on unharmed and we'll go back to tax rates that were better than the current ones. what do you think? >> i certainly don't want something that will put us into a recession. that's more republican thinking. but i think ultimately pugh has a pole saying 53% of the american people will blame republicans, to which i can only imagine republicans saying oh we're finally ahead in a poll. boner is like a slug there is a bright orange trail of cheat toe dust and bronzer leading from his office. >> stephanie: okay. here you go. >> so many people are going to part-time work and being hurt. everyone i know is already seeing cutbacks, and the economy is going to be disastrous and only going to get worse under obama. >> stephanie: by the way that was dexter von frisch? >> it was. >> stephanie: he just screams at ann coulters voice? >> it's like an eart
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)